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War & Society Studies

Added September 09, 2014
Type: Book
Political and Socio-Economic Change: Revolutions and Their Implications for the U.S. Military. Edited by Dr. John R. Deni.
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Managing change in the international security environment—whether revolutionary or evolutionary in nature—is never an uncomplicated task. The authors address the military implications of political and social change in the Middle East, North Africa, and Latin America.
Added August 08, 2014
Type: Book
Strategic Retrenchment and Renewal in the American Experience. Edited by Dr. Peter Feaver.
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Amid fiscal austerity and international crisis, should the United States seek to renew its global leadership, or retrench its geopolitical commitments? This volume brings historical and theoretical insights to bear on that question through a series of essays that examine the current debate as well as past episodes in which American leaders were confronted with similar choices.
Added March 19, 2014
Type: Monograph
Defense Planning for National Security: Navigation Aids for the Mystery Tour. Authored by Dr. Colin S. Gray.
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What do we believe we know about the future with sufficient reliability for it to serve as a basis for defense planning? Science and social science are both utterly disarmed by the complete absence of data about the future, from the future.
Added March 12, 2014
Type: Monograph
Turkey-Kurdish Regional Government Relations After the U.S. Withdrawal From Iraq: Putting the Kurds on the Map? Authored by Bill Park.
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The withdrawal of U.S. combat forces from Iraq at the end of 2011 left behind a set of unresolved problems in the relationship between the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), and the Federal Government in Baghdad, compounded by Erbil’s subsequent pursuit of an energy relationship with Turkey. This has deepened both Turkish-Iraqi and regional sectarian tensions and, along with developments in Syria, has raised the specter of wider Kurdish self-determination, a prospect that Washington has been slow to recognize.