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Publications Tagged: globalization

Fourth-Generation War and Other Myths... Cover Image
Added November 01, 2005
Fourth-Generation War and Other Myths. Authored by Dr. Antulio J. Echevarria, II.
Dr Antulio J. Echevarria II critiques the theory of fourth-generation warfare, examining its problematic assumptions and logical flaws. He argues that this theory is hopelessly flawed and that its proponents undermine their credibility by subscribing to it.
The Strategic Implications of the Rise of Populism... Cover Image
Added June 01, 2005
The Strategic Implications of the Rise of Populism in Europe and South America. Authored by Dr. Steve C. Ropp.
Are U.S. policy planners adequately prepared to deal with a potential future burst of populist turbulence in Europe or South America? Steve C. Ropp looks at this understudied phenomenon and offers some suggestions to strategic planners for mitigating its effects on the global democratic core of representative democracies.
From "Defending Forward" to a "Glob... Cover Image
Added October 01, 2003
From "Defending Forward" to a "Global Defense-In-Depth": Globalization and Homeland Security. Authored by Dr. Antulio J. Echevarria, II, Prof. Bert B. Tussing.
The authors have examined the scope and substance of our National Security Strategy for Homeland Security (NSHS). Disturbingly, they find that the NSHS fails to address the challenges that globalization poses for the security of the American homeland.
Globalization and the Nature of War... Cover Image
Added March 01, 2003
Globalization and the Nature of War. Authored by Dr. Antulio J. Echevarria, II.
Globalization—the spread of information and information technologies, along with greater public participation in economic and political processes—is transforming every aspect of human affairs. What is not yet clear, however, are the impacts of these trends, especially how they might affect the nature of war. This monograph argues that the Clausewitzian trinity—hostility, chance, purpose—is still a valid way of looking at the nature of war in the 21st century.