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Publications Tagged: Central Asia

U.S. Interests in Central Asia and the Challenges ... Cover Image
Added March 22, 2007
U.S. Interests in Central Asia and the Challenges to Them. Authored by Dr. Stephen J. Blank.
The author assesses U.S. interests in Central Asia and the challenges to them. He recommends policies designed to meet those challenges to American policy in this increasingly more important area of the world.
Iron Troikas: The New Threat from the East... Cover Image
Added March 28, 2006
Iron Troikas: The New Threat from the East. Authored by Dr. Richard J. Krickus.
The author explains how the Russian leadership has exploited its energy assets to advance its security interests in the vital East Baltic Sea Region, particularly Poland and the Baltic countries.
Multilateral Constraints on the Use of Force: A Re... Cover Image
Added March 01, 2006
Multilateral Constraints on the Use of Force: A Reassessment. Authored by Dr. Seyom Brown.
Although much of the controversy over the extent to which U.S. security policy ought to be constrained by multilateralism revolves around the role of the UN, the focus of this monograph is on the future of NATO.
Natural Allies? Regional Security in Asia and Pros... Cover Image
Added October 01, 2005
Natural Allies? Regional Security in Asia and Prospects for Indo-American Strategic Cooperation. Authored by Dr. Stephen J. Blank.
American military power has created a strategic revolution by its successful and prolonged projection into and from Central Asia. This monograph explores the strategic and policy ramifications of that revolution in strategic affairs.
After Two Wars: Reflections on the American Strate... Cover Image
Added July 01, 2005
After Two Wars: Reflections on the American Strategic Revolution in Central Asia. Authored by Dr. Stephen J. Blank.
U.S. military access to Central Asia and the Caucasus is a long-standing fact, but it is desirable as well for the future. The author explains why it is necessary, and how we might ensure that we retain this access to confront future contingencies.
The U.S.-India Relationship: Strategic Partnership... Cover Image
Added February 01, 2005
The U.S.-India Relationship: Strategic Partnership or Complementary Interests? Authored by Dr. Amit Gupta.
This monograph discusses the potential for U.S.-India security cooperation and the possible avenues such cooperation may take.
Strategic Consequences of the Iraq War: U.S. Secur... Cover Image
Added May 01, 2004
Strategic Consequences of the Iraq War: U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia Reassessed. Authored by Dr. Elizabeth Wishnick.
The U.S.-led war in Iraq complicates security cooperation between the United States and Central Asia at a time when other regional powers—especially Russia, China, and India—are competing for influence in the region more overtly. The author argues that the United States should do more to address the underlying human security problems in Central Asia, which increase its vulnerability to terrorist movements.
Countering Global Terrorism: Developing the Antite... Cover Image
Added February 01, 2004
Countering Global Terrorism: Developing the Antiterrorist Capabilities of the Central Asian Militaries. Authored by Mr. Roger N. McDermott.
The author offers a framework for improving the antiterrorist capabilities of the Central Asian militaries, including increased and focused military training with a special emphasis on Special Forces units.
Growing U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia... Cover Image
Added October 01, 2002
Growing U.S. Security Interests in Central Asia. Authored by Dr. Elizabeth Wishnick.
The author notes that strengthening the Central Asian states against terrorism and assisting their transition to stable and prosperous nations are difficult and fraught with danger. If not astutely managed, this strategy could have the opposite of the intended results and generate increased instability, spark anti-Americanism, and antagonize Russia and China. To avoid this, Dr. Wishnick advocates a multilateral strategy that integrates the military, political, and economic elements of national power and prods the Central Asian regimes toward reform.