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LTC William E. Rapp

External Researcher

WILLIAM E. RAPP, a Lieutenant Colonel (P) in the U.S. Army, is a career soldier who has served in a variety of assignments around the world. Most recently, he served as a Council on Foreign Relations- Hitachi International Affairs Fellow at the Institute for International Policy Studies in Tokyo. Prior to that fellowship, he commanded a combat engineer battalion in Bamberg, Germany, served as a military assistant in the Army Secretariat in the Pentagon, and held troop assignments in Fort Lewis, Washington; Fort Bragg, North Carolina; and in N├╝rnberg, Germany. He commanded an airborne engineer company in Operations DESERT SHIELD and DESERT STORM. He holds a B.S. from the United States Military Academy, an M.A. in political science from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in Political Science (International Relations) from Stanford University. He is a graduate of the Command and General Staff College and is currently attending the U.S. Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.

*The above information may not be current. It was current at the time when the individual worked for SSI or was published by SSI.

SSI books and monographs by LTC William E. Rapp

  • Paths Diverging? The Next Decade in the U.S.-Japan Security Alliance

    January 01, 2004

    Authored by LTC William E. Rapp.
    The author explores the changing nature of Japanese security policy and the impact of those changes on the U.S.-Japan security alliance. He begins his analysis by acquainting the reader with an insider's view of the conflicted Japanese conceptions of security policy and the various ideational and structural restraints on expanding the role of the military.