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Robert B. Oakley

External Researcher

ROBERT B. OAKLEY is a member of the faculty in the Institute for National Strategic Studies at National Defense University. After graduating from Princeton University in 1952, Ambassador Oakley had a distinguished career in the Foreign Service during which he served in embassies in Abidjan, Saigon, Paris, and Beirut. In 1977 he was named Deputy to the Assistant Secretary of State for East Asia and Pacific Affairs. He served as U.S. Ambassador to Zaire from November 1979 until August 1982 and then became Ambassador to Somalia where he served until September 1984. Next he became Director of the State Department Office of Combatting Terrorism. On January 1, 1987, he was named to the National Security Council Staff as Assistant to the President for Middle East and South Asia, and in August 1988 became Ambassador to Pakistan. In December 1992, President Bush named Ambassador Oakley Special Envoy for Somalia and he served there with Operation Restore Hope until March 1993. Later that year, in October, President Bill Clinton called Ambassador Oakley back to this challenge, in which he served until March 1994.

*The above information may not be current. It was current at the time when the individual worked for SSI or was published by SSI.

SSI books and monographs by Robert B. Oakley

  • Two Perspectives on Interventions and Humanitarian Operations

    July 01, 1997

    Authored by David Tucker, Robert B. Oakley. Edited by Dr. Earl H. Tilford, Jr..
    Ambassador Robert B. Oakley, who served as Special Envoy to Somalia provides an honest and compelling look at that controversial operation. In the second paper, Dr. David Tucker dissects the arguments to develop criteria which might be used for and against engagement in humanitarian operations in an attempt to guide U.S. policymakers. Ambassador Oakley and Dr. Tucker both agree that the United States, as a great power, will be engaged in intervention operations of all kinds all over the world.