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Dr. Andrew M. Dorman

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Dr. Andrew M. Dorman is a Senior Lecturer in the Defence Studies Department, King’s College, London, based at the United Kingdom’s Joint Services Command and Staff College. He previously trained as a Chartered Accountant with KPMG Peat Marwick at their Cambridge office, qualifying in 1990 before returning to academia. He has previously taught at the Royal Naval Staff College, Greenwich, and at the University of Birmingham. He has published widely and specializes in British defense and security policy, defense transformation, and European Security. Dr. Dorman is on the governing councils of the International Security Studies Section of the International Studies Association and the International Security and Arms Control Section of the American Political Science Association. He is also the Founding Chair of the APSA’s Kenneth N. Waltz Dissertation Prize and Editor of World Defence Systems. Dr. Dorman holds a masters’ degree and Ph.D. from the University of Birmingham.

*The above information may not be current. It was current at the time when the individual worked for SSI or was published by SSI.

SSI books and monographs by Dr. Andrew M. Dorman

  • Transforming to Effects-Based Operations: Lessons from the United Kingdom Experience

    January 30, 2008

    Authored by Dr. Andrew M. Dorman.
    The author evaluates the extent to which America’s principal military ally, the United Kingdom, has been able to transition to effects-based operations and the implications this has for the United States.

  • European Adaptation to Expeditionary Warfare: Implications for the U.S. Army

    November 01, 2002

    Authored by Dr. Andrew M. Dorman.
    The establishment of a European expeditionary force will be no easy matter, will require substantial investment, and will take years to complete. However, it is the right course for Europe to take. The European Union (EU) cannot manage emerging security issues using Cold War legacy forces because they are too ponderous to deploy. A lighter, more nimble expeditionary force is critical to EU policy.