Text Browser Navigation Bar: Main Site Navigation and Search | Current Page Navigation | Current Page Content

U.S. Army War College >> Strategic Studies Institute >> Publications >> Military Leadership >> Show All Publications

Login to "My SSI" Contact About SSI Cart: 0 items

Military Leadership Studies

Added September 10, 2010
Type: Letort Papers
An Army Transformed: The U.S. Army's Post-Vietnam Recovery and the Dynamics of Change in Military Organizations. Authored by Lieutenant Colonel Suzanne C. Nielsen.
Drawing on the literature on military innovation and reform, the author examines an important case of military change: the transformation of the U.S. Army in the 2 decades preceding the Persian Gulf War of 1991. The findings of this study have significant implications for how the U.S. Army should think about implementing changes needed today to meet new strategic, economic, and technological challenges.
Added September 02, 2010
Type: Letort Papers
Is the Organizational Culture of the U.S. Army Congruent with the Professional Development of Its Senior Level Officer Corps? Authored by Dr. James G. Pierce.
In this study of the organizational culture of the U.S. Army, Dr. Pierce has reviewed a previously assumed but unverified connection between organizational culture and professional development. The study has uncovered a lack of congruence between the dominant type of organizational culture of the U.S. Army and the professional managerial/leadership skills of its senior level leaders. This observed lack of congruence may be inhibiting performance and unconsciously perpetuating a cycle of caution and an overreliance on stability and control. The data indicate that the U.S. Army is illustrative of an organization that emphasizes stability and control, and one that attempts to comprehend the ambiguity of the future through an unconscious reliance upon the successful solutions employed in the past.
Added September 02, 2010
Type: "Of Interest"
Lessons Learned – 13 Months as the Senior Military Advisor to the Minister of Interior. Authored by COL Kevin J. Palgutt.
In recounting his experiences as a senior advisor to the Afghan Minister of Interior, COL Palgutt indicates that it is a shame that many senior advisors will go on to new duty assignments that will have nothing to do with the experiences that were learned during their 12+ months of senior advisor duty.
Added August 05, 2010
Type: Monograph
Organizing to Compete in the Political Terrain. Authored by Dr. Nadia Schadlow.
The degree to which military forces can and should shape the political landscape during war--that is, who rules contested territory--is at the root of several ongoing debates about how to restructure the U.S. Army. Decisions about the military's appropriate role in shaping political outcomes in war are fundamental to resolving these debates and will determine the degree of organizational and educational changes that the U.S. Army must make to meet current and future security threats.
Added July 20, 2010
Type: Monograph
Got Vision? Unity of Vision in Policy and Strategy: What It Is and Why We Need It. Authored by Dr. Anna Simons.
Having the right "who" to devise strategy is critical to success in counterinsurgency or any asymmetric, cross-cultural encounter. This monograph contends that if we do not get the "who" right, none of the "whats," in terms of what we do, matters.
Added July 08, 2010
Type: Op-Ed
Enter the Era of Persistent Competition for Talent. Authored by COL Carolyn F. Kleiner.
Each month a member of the SSI faculty writes an editorial for our monthly newsletter. This is the Op-Ed for the July 2010 newsletter.
Added May 10, 2010
Type: Op-Ed
Untangling a New Gordian Knot: Don't Ask, Don’t Tell, and Alexander’s Sword. Authored by Dr. Leonard Wong, Professor Douglas C. Lovelace, Jr..
Each month a member of the SSI faculty writes an editorial for our monthly newsletter. This is the Op-Ed for the May 2010 newsletter.
Added May 05, 2010
Type: Monograph
Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Employing Talent. Authored by Colonel Casey Wardynski, Lieutenant Colonel David S. Lyle, Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso.
Historically, the U.S. Army has employed its officers to good effect, but is there need for improvement? Does its current assignments paradigm lead to optimal career satisfaction and productivity? Does it allow officers to develop the depth and breadth of talent the Army needs? Perhaps most importantly, does the Army really know enough about the officer talent it possesses, as well as the requirements for that talent?
Added March 29, 2010
Type: Monograph
Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Developing Talent. Authored by Colonel Casey Wardynski, Lieutenant Colonel David S. Lyle, Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso.
The U.S. Army is almost universally acknowledged as an organization that powerfully develops talent in areas such as leadership, teamwork behavior, work ethics, adaptability, fitness, and many others. Employers know that the Army invests substantially in its people, and that this investment translates directly into enhanced productivity. Despite this well-earned reputation, however, are the Army’s current officer development programs equal to tomorrow’s challenges? Does it suffer from a growing imbalance in talent supply versus demand? Perhaps most importantly, is there an effective relationship between its developmental and employment strategies?
Added February 19, 2010
Type: Monograph
Accessing Talent: The Foundation of a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy. Authored by Colonel Casey Wardynski, Lieutenant Colonel David S. Lyle, Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso.
Organizations often focus their recruiting efforts on high-payoff markets--how does the Army identify the right market in which to focus its officer accessions efforts? What role does education play in officer accessions? How does the Army identify and go about meeting its officer diversity requirements? Why is establishing the proper ratio between commissioning sources so important?
Added February 03, 2010
Type: Op-Ed
A Death Knell for "Don't Ask, Don't Tell". Authored by Professor John R. Martin.
Each month a member of the SSI faculty writes an editorial for our monthly newsletter. This is the Op-Ed for the February 2010 newsletter.
Added February 01, 2010
Type: Monograph
The Army Officers' Professional Ethic--Past, Present, and Future. Authored by Colonel Matthew Moten.
Do you think the Army officer corps needs a clear statement of its professional ethic? Colonel Matthew Moten does, and he has written it in one page. Join the debate.

NB:
In the Fall of 2013, the author of this monograph, Army Colonel Matthew Moten, chose to retire amid reports of his reprimand for misconduct and removal as head of the U.S. Military Academy's History Department, following an investigation of allegations made against him. Published in 2010, this monograph presents the results of Colonel Moten's critical analysis of an issue important to the Army: deepening our understanding of what the Professional Military Ethic means to the profession today. The monograph remains a solid contribution to the dialogue among professionals the Army leadership sought to ignite. In particular, readers should note well Moten's closing paragraphs:

"Before the Army accepts such a statement of its professional ethic, much debate is in order. Should we use hard phrases such as "total accountability" and "unlimited liability?" What are officers' core responsibilities as leaders and how far do they extend?

How concisely should we explicate our adherence to the principle of civilian control? Should we espouse nonpartisanship as part of our ethic? The debate required to answer such questions will provide impetus for an Army-wide discussion about the profession, its ethical values, and the role that it should play as a servant of American society in the future. Let it begin."

We, at the U.S. Army War College believe the conversation on the Army's professional ethic must continue, and still find value in Moten's 2010 work, notwithstanding the situation that led to his relief.

Added January 28, 2010
Type: Monograph
The Effects of Multiple Deployments on Army Adolescents. Authored by Dr. Leonard Wong, Dr. Stephen J. Gerras.
Frequent U.S. Army deployments increase the burden on children who must face the stress and strain of separation and anxiety. The authors take a much-needed, detailed look at the effects of multiple deployments on Army adolescents.
Added January 15, 2010
Type: Monograph
Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Retaining Talent. Authored by Colonel Casey Wardynski, Lieutenant Colonel David S. Lyle, Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso.
Why have Army junior officer retention rates plummeted since 1983? Are the root causes truly understood? What are the long term consequences of failing to retain talented young officers? What steps has the Army taken to meet this challenge, and how effective have they been? What must the Army do to restore junior officer retention rates to previously healthy levels?