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Military Leadership Studies

Added August 07, 2015
Type: Other
2015-16 Key Strategic Issues List. Edited by Professor John F. Troxell.
The recently published National Military Strategy emphasizes the unpredictability of the global security environment. According to General Dempsey, “global disorder has significantly increased while some of our comparative military advantage has begun to erode. We now face multiple, simultaneous security challenges…” General Odierno echoes this concern by pointing to the “increased velocity of instability,” and emboldened potential adversaries that have “magnified the risk to U.S. interests around the world.” Responding to this period of geopolitical uncertainty demands thoughtful and careful analysis of a wide array of strategic issues. The Strategic Studies Institutes’ (SSI) annual Key Strategic Issues List (KSIL) addresses this need by providing a list of high-priority topics organized to support the Army's most important strategic objectives, issues that must be addressed to ensure the Army of 2025 and beyond will continue to meet the needs of the nation. Part I of the KSIL lists the Chief of Staff of the Army’s top five topics, all five of which will be addressed as integrative research projects by the US Army War College. Part II, “Priority Research Areas,” is a compilation of critical topics developed by the Army War College and Commands and organizations throughout the Army. Part III consists of the Army Warfighting Challenges. Students and researchers are encouraged to get in touch with the topic sponsors listed in the document, tackle one of these issues, and contribute to the knowledge base needed to support the future direction of the Army.
Added August 04, 2015
Type: Student (Carlisle) Papers
A Shared Burden: The Military and Civilian Consequences of Army Pain Management Since 2001. Authored by Colonel Craig Trebilcock.
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The Army has developed a prescription pain pill culture since 2001 that is not being adequately addressed through current Army enforcement and medical policies. A survey of recent U.S. Army War College graduates and civilian Veterans Court judges suggests the road to an opioid free fighting force lies not in more enforcement, but in prescription reform, Soldier medical monitoring, and meaningful rehabilitation programs.
Added July 30, 2015
Type: Monograph
The Limits of Military Officers’ Duty to Obey Civilian Orders: A Neo-Classical Perspective. Authored by Robert E. Atkinson, Jr.
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When must military officers obey civilian orders; when may they, or must they, disobey? This paper tries to ground both the professional duty of obedience and the standard exceptions, legal and moral, in a classical understanding of the common good.
Added June 30, 2015
Type: Monograph
Paid to Perform: Aligning Total Military Compensation with Talent Management, Vol. 8. Authored by Roy A. Wallace, Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso, COL Andrew O. Hall, Lieutenant Colonel David S. Lyle, Major Michael S. Walker.
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Talent-driven officer management demands a compensation system capable of rewarding a diverse range of individual skills, knowledge, and behaviors. This monograph outlines proposed changes to U.S. military officer compensation, providing a set of tools ideally suited to the task of maintaining a competitive edge in defense-specific human capital.
Added June 29, 2015
Type: Other
The Army War College Review Vol. 1 No. 2. Edited by Dr. Larry D Miller.
The Army War College Review, a refereed publication of student work, is produced under the purview of the Strategic Studies Institute and the United States Army War College. An electronic quarterly, The AWC Review connects student intellectual work with professionals invested in U.S. national security, Landpower, strategic leadership, global security studies, and the advancement of the profession of arms.
Added April 30, 2015
Type: Book
Stand Up and Fight! The Creation of U.S. Security Organizations, 1942-2005. Edited by Colonel Ty Seidule, Dr. Jacqueline E. Whitt.
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Stand Up and Fight is a collection of essays that explores how new National Security Organizations are stood up—that is, formed, organized, funded, and managed—in the first years of their existence. From Joint ventures to combatant commands to cabinet-level departments, each organization’s history reveals important themes and lessons for leaders to consider in forming a new organization.
Added March 12, 2015
Type: Other
The Army War College Review Vol. 1 No.1. Edited by Dr. Larry D Miller.
The Army War College Review, a refereed publication of student work, is produced under the purview of the Strategic Studies Institute and the United States Army War College. An electronic quarterly, The AWC Review connects student intellectual work with professionals invested in U.S. national security, Landpower, strategic leadership, global security studies, and the advancement of the profession of arms.
Added February 17, 2015
Type: Monograph
Lying to Ourselves: Dishonesty in the Army Profession. Authored by Dr. Leonard Wong, Dr. Stephen J. Gerras.
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Untruthfulness is surprisingly common in the U.S. military even though members of the profession are loath to admit it. Further, much of the deception and dishonesty that occurs in the profession of arms is actually encouraged and sanctioned by the military institution.
Added January 13, 2015
Type: Monograph
Getting to the Left of SHARP: Lessons Learned from West Point's Efforts to Combat Sexual Harassment and Assault. Authored by Lieutenant General Robert L. Caslen, Jr., Colonel Cindy R. Jebb, Lieutenant Colonel Daniel Gade, Cadet Hope C. Landsem.
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On July 26, 1948, President Harry Truman signed Executive Order 9981, ending the practice of segregating the military services by race. That same year, the Army allowed women to join the services on an equal basis with men. Both of these steps preceded the larger societal changes that allowed fully equal treatment of all types of American citizens in military service. Just over 2 years ago, Congress repealed the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy, allowing for gays and lesbians to take their place openly in the military. While we have a long way to go, one of the hallmarks of a profession is its continued efforts to improve. To that end, this monograph shares a few of the lessons West Point has learned on the prevention of sexual harassment and assault.
Added January 02, 2015
Type: Monograph
The Effective Use of Reserve Personnel in the U.S. Military: Lessons from the United Kingdom Reserve Model. Authored by Dr. Shima D. Keene.
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Can the U.S. Army and other services benefit from the United Kingdom's program of reserve reform?