Text Browser Navigation Bar: Main Site Navigation and Search | Current Page Navigation | Current Page Content

U.S. Army War College >> Strategic Studies Institute >> Publications >> Middle East & North Africa >> Show All Publications

Login to "My SSI" Contact About SSI Cart: 0 items

Middle East & North Africa Studies

Added September 11, 2014
Type: Monograph
After the Spring: Reforming Arab Armies. Authored by Dr. Florence Gaub.
View the Executive Summary

The Arab Spring has returned Arab military forces and their necessity for reform to the forefront. Outside actors, such as the United States, are now asked to rethink their security assistance in broader terms, shifting toward comprehensive security sector reform. As several countries are facing large-scale security implosion, terrorism, politicization of the military and protracted instability, the time for reform was never more imminent than now.
Added July 21, 2014
Type: Monograph
Revival of Political Islam in the Aftermath of Arab Uprisings: Implications for the Region and Beyond. Authored by Dr. Mohammed El-Katiri.
View the Executive Summary

The rise to power of Islamist political parties in a number of North African states over the past 3 years has caused widespread concern over the future domestic and foreign policy directions of those states. This monograph explores political change in Egypt, Tunisia, and Morocco, and concludes that despite political crises in each country, worst case scenarios have not been borne out and there is hope for optimism.
Added June 13, 2014
Type: Letort Papers
Countering Radicalization and Recruitment to Al-Qaeda: Fighting the War of Deeds. Authored by Dr. Paul Kamolnick.
View the Executive Summary

Fighting the War of Deeds begins by taking deeds seriously—deadly serious—as action, policy, and communication. As communication, deeds furnish the U.S. Government a uniquely potent means for countering al-Qaeda’s terrorist propaganda effectively, and also building longer-term alliances based on mutuality with the Arab and Muslim world.
Added May 23, 2014
Type: Monograph
Islamism and Security in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Authored by Leslie S. Lebl.
View the Executive Summary

Bosnia-Herzegovina, once thought to be on the way to joining the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the European Union (EU), is instead falling behind, mired in political bickering, economic stalemate and governmental dysfunction. In this difficult situation, Islamism poses a significant threat to Bosnia’s fragile domestic stability.
Added May 16, 2014
Type: Monograph
From War to Deterrence? Israel-Hezbollah Conflict Since 2006. Authored by Dr. Jean-Loup Samaan.
View the Executive Summary

Over the last 7 years, the border between Israel and Lebanon has remained quiet. Against all odds, in a Middle East experiencing tremendous challenges, Israel and Hezbollah did not trigger a new conflict. Here is the paradox of stability between these two foes which is at the origin of this monograph.
Added May 06, 2014
Type: Monograph
The Resurgence of Al-Qaeda in Syria and Iraq. Authored by Dr. Azeem Ibrahim.
View the Executive Summary

The Syrian civil war has allowed al-Qaeda to recover from its setbacks up to 2010. Syria has also seen a civil war between two al-Qaeda inspired factions (Al Nusrah and the Iraq based Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant) and indicates there are limits to its ability to cooperate with other anti-Assad factions and gain popular appeal.
Added March 12, 2014
Type: Monograph
Turkey-Kurdish Regional Government Relations After the U.S. Withdrawal From Iraq: Putting the Kurds on the Map? Authored by Bill Park.
View the Executive Summary

The withdrawal of U.S. combat forces from Iraq at the end of 2011 left behind a set of unresolved problems in the relationship between the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), and the Federal Government in Baghdad, compounded by Erbil’s subsequent pursuit of an energy relationship with Turkey. This has deepened both Turkish-Iraqi and regional sectarian tensions and, along with developments in Syria, has raised the specter of wider Kurdish self-determination, a prospect that Washington has been slow to recognize.