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Middle East & North Africa Studies

Added December 30, 2013
Type: Book
Africa's Booming Oil and Natural Gas Exploration and Production: National Security Implications for the United States and China. Authored by David E. Brown.
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Two key long-term energy trends are shifting the strategic balance between the United States and China, the world’s superpower rivals in the 21st century: first, a domestic boom in U.S. shale oil and gas dramatically boosting America’s energy security; second, the frenetic and successful search for hydrocarbons in Africa making it an increasingly crucial element in China’s energy diversification strategy.
Added August 21, 2013
Type: Other
2013-14 Key Strategic Issues List. Edited by Professor John F. Troxell.
For several years, the Strategic Studies Institute has annually published the Key Strategic Issues List (KSIL). The overall purpose of this document is to make students and other researchers aware of strategic topics that are of special interest to the U.S. Army. Part I of KSIL is entitled "Army Priorities for Strategic Analysis" (APSA) and is a list of high-priority topics submitted by Headquarters, Department of the Army. Part II is entitled "Command Sponsored Topics" and represents the high-priority command-specific topics submitted by MACOMs and ASCCs. This KSIL provides military and civilian researchers worldwide a listing of the Army's most critical national security issues.
Added August 08, 2013
Type: Letort Papers
AFRICOM at 5 Years: The Maturation of a New U.S. Combatant Command. Authored by David E. Brown.
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Created in 2007, the new U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) has matured greatly over the last 5 years, overcoming much of the initial resistance from African stakeholders and the U.S. interagency about a “militarization” of U.S. foreign policy in Africa. This Letort Paper describes the geostrategic, operational, and intellectual changes that explain why AFRICOM was created, debunks three negative myths about AFRICOM’s current operations, and raises five issues important to AFRICOM’s future, including the need to carry out a “right-sizing” exercise at AFRICOM during a time of severe budget constraints and a real risk for the United States of “strategic insolvency.”
Added June 28, 2013
Type: Letort Papers
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization and Libya: Reviewing Operation UNIFIED PROTECTOR. Authored by Dr. Florence Gaub.
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NATO's Libya Operation UNIFIED PROTECTOR is considered a military success. As this monograph shows, multiple strategic lessons can be learned from it.
Added June 21, 2013
Type: Monograph
The Struggle for Yemen and the Challenge of Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. Authored by Dr. W. Andrew Terrill.
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How does al-Qaeda's regional and international terrorist acts compare with those of the al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), particularly in Yemen? Although Yemen's new reform government defeated AQAP and recaptured areas lost to AQAP in 2012, the terrorists remain an extremely dangerous force seeking to reassert themselves at this time of transition in Yemen.
Added June 10, 2013
Type: Monograph
The Future of the Arab Gulf Monarchies in the Age of Uncertainties. Authored by Dr. Mohammed El-Katiri.
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This monograph assesses the challenges facing the Arab Gulf’s rulers, and proposes meaningful political reform as a means of mitigating these challenges.
Added May 17, 2013
Type: Letort Papers
The Challenge of Drug Trafficking to Democratic Governance and Human Security in West Africa. Authored by David E. Brown.
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International criminal networks—some with links to terrorism—represent an existential threat to democratic governance of already fragile states in West Africa, and are using drugs to buy political power, fray West Africa’s traditional social fabric, and create a public health crisis. Drug trafficking represents the most serious challenge to human security in the region since resource conflicts rocked several West African countries in the early 1990s; international aid to the subregion’s “war on drugs” is only in an initial stage, and progress will be have to be measured in decades, not years.
Added May 13, 2013
Type: Monograph
War and Insurgency in the Western Sahara. Authored by Staff Researcher.
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Home to the largest functional military barrier in the world, the Western Sahara has a long history of colonial conquest and resistance, guerrilla warfare and counterinsurgency, and evolving strategic thought. This monograph explores the past, present, and future of the region, including its relationship to developments in Morocco, Algeria, and elsewhere in North Africa.
Added April 11, 2013
Type: Monograph
Egypt's New Regime and the Future of the U.S.-Egyptian Strategic Relationship. Authored by Gregory Aftandilian.
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This monograph, completed in August 2012, analyzes the developments in Egypt from January 2011 to August 2012 and addresses the following questions that are pertinent to U.S. policymakers: How does the United States maintain good relations and preserve its strategic partnership with Egypt under Cairo’s new political leadership and the changing political environment in the country? How does it do so while adhering to American values such as supporting democracy even when those coming to power do not share U.S. strategic goals?
Added March 20, 2013
Type: Monograph
Governance, Identity, and Counterinsurgency: Evidence from Ramadi and Tal Afar. Authored by Dr. Michael Fitzsimmons.
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Western thinking on counterinsurgency seems to be that success in countering insurgencies depends on a perception of legitimacy among local populations. However, it may be more correct to consider the identity of who governs, rather than on how whoever governs governs.