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Eastern Europe Studies

Added December 01, 1996
Type: Monograph
Force, Statecraft and German Unity: The Struggle to Adapt Institutions and Practices. Edited by Dr. Thomas-Durell Young.
Concerning Bonn's ongoing attempt to adapt institutions and practices, German policy making is clearly a manifestation of officials largely navigating in a little-known policy milieu. Realpolitik, let alone Machtpolitik (either as mere terms, let alone as concepts) are neither freely used in "polite" political discord in Germany, nor widely contemplated.
Added October 01, 1996
Type: Book
Ethnic Conflict and European Security: Lessons from the Past and Implications for the Future. Authored by Ms. Maria Alongi.
On October 23-25, 1995, coinciding with the Bosnia peace talks being held in Dayton, Ohio, Women in International Security (WIIS), an international, nonpartisan educational program; The Friedrich-Eberet Foundation; the U.S. Institute of Peace; and the Army War College's Strategic Studies Institute sponsored a conference, "Ethnic Conflict and European Security: Lessons from the Past and Implications for the Future."
Added June 01, 1996
Type: Book
U.S. Participation in IFOR: A Marathon, not a Sprint. Authored by Dr. William T. Johnsen.
This monograph examines the potential for creating suitable conditions for a lasting political settlement in Bosnia by December 1996, identifies possible outcomes of a U.S. withdrawal from IFOR, and assesses potential consequences for U.S. national objectives and interests within the Balkans, and beyond. The conclusions will not sit well with most in the United States.
Added April 01, 1996
Type: Book
Prague, NATO, and European Security. Authored by Dr. Stephen J. Blank.
One of the most likely candidates for future membership in NATO is the Czech Republic. Inasmuch as the debate over this issue is engaging chancelleries all over the United States and Europe, it is necessary to understand how the prospective members view European security issues, what they hope to gain from membership, and how their interests and security relationships mesh with NATO's.